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Published: 25 Sep 2017

Virgin Atlantic to Broadcast On-Board Comedy Festival

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Jacobson will perform on a Virgin Atlantic flight

British airline Virgin Atlantic has just become the first European carrier to offer transatlantic wi-fi across its entire fleet. To promote this new amenity, Virgin will reverse the flow of on-board entertainment: instead of packaging content from the outside world for its passengers, the carrier will host and broadcast live comedy shows taking place on airborne planes.

On September 28, six US comedians will take off from London Heathrow on six separate US-bound flights. Abbi Jacobs, co-creator of broadcaster Comedy Central's show Broad City, is headliner and curator of the #LiveFromVirgin Comedy Festival. Rather than perching on a wooden stool in the aisle, the comedians will use Virgin Atlantic's on-board wi-fi to broadcast their sets in Instagram Stories and tweets.

"There have been airlines that have done movie screenings and live music, but those are all for a very small audience, for the people flying," explained Scott Vitrone, partner and chief creative officer at Figliulo & Partners, the agency behind the festival. "We want to broadcast it to the world." The #LiveFromVirgin Comedy Festival ties into an existing hashtag the brand already uses to share moments from its passengers and staff in the air.

For more on sharing live experiences on digital channels, see Retail's VR Future: Communal Digital and Rebuilding Consumer Trust: Advertising Week Europe 2017. For the latest industry insights on social engagement, look out for our coverage of Social Media Week London 2017, publishing this week.

Published: 25 Sep 2017

Tech Show 2017: Advanced Bots & Brain-Interfacing Retail

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Advanced bots and brain computer interfaces

Spotlighting the growing importance of live, conversational and more intuitive forms of real-time commerce, UK trade publication Retail Week’s inaugural Tech conference took place in London last week (September 13-14). Tackling both here-and-now and futuristic concepts driven by artificial intelligence (AI), key developments include the prospect of brain-controlled interfaces and robots. Here are the highlights.

  • Individualised Fashion Advice Upgrades Service Bot: UK fashion e-tailer Very’s retail and technology director Jon Rudoe revealed that the company is working with IBM’s Watson AI software to upgrade its bot-based Assistant app, launched late 2016. The evolved service will respond directly to consumer’s questions to provide individualised fashion advice, such as which shoes suit a specific outfit. At present, the bot only deals with more basic ‘pick from a menu’-type queries such as the tracking of a parcel or handling returns, easing pressure on customer service staff. 
  • Shoppers Search, Brands Get to Look On: Tracy Issel, general manager of worldwide retail at Microsoft, shared its plans to launch interactive AI bot Cami with British electronics brand Dixons Carphone in November 2017. Cami will let customers check what’s in stock, help them research big-ticket purchases such as TVs or white goods by asking questions, and autonomously find and save specific products to their online profile. It will also allow store staff to see what each customer has been searching for, giving them a realistic idea of what’s building momentum.  
  • Dawn of ‘Brain-Computer’ Interfaces: Naji El-Arifi, head of innovation at British strategic marketing agency Salmon, discussed the more futuristic evolution of real-time retail. He flagged Facebook’s 2017 development work on a “brain-computer interface” that allows users to type 100 words per minute using just their minds, without invasive implants. Instead, the team plans to use optical imaging to scan the brain 100 times per second to detect ‘internal speaking’ and translate it into text.  It’s currently working on the project with universities including UC San Francisco, UC Berkley, John Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory and Washington University School of Medicine.

    Facebook isn’t the only organisation exploring brain-computer interfaces. Scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Boston University are developing a brain-controlled robot  using data from an electoencephalography (EEG) monitor that records brain activity. The aim, says CSAIL director Daniela Rus, is to instigate actions instantaneously without needing to type or even speak a command – “a streamlined approach that would improve our ability to supervise factory robots and driverless cars, and other technologies we haven’t even invented yet”. Such concepts could fuel some of the ideas pinpointed in Retail: Workforce Tech Innovations, 2017.

    In spring 2017, US tech entrepreneur and PayPal founder Elon Musk founded Neuralink to explore this form of computing. Its first application is in medicine, helping people who are paralysed or have motor difficulties. But the technology could potentially unlock new possibilities in the growing realm of shopping via ambient interfaces – even transcending voice-activated concepts. For example, it could allow someone to order more coffee simply by consciously thinking it. However, while investment in the area is growing, the technology is several years away from being robust enough to operate in a commercial or home environment.

For more on conversational commerce and live retail concepts, see Reflexive Retail, part of our Liquid Retail Industry Trend. See also AI-First Engagement in our Invisible Marketing Industry Trend.

Published: 25 Sep 2017

Mushroom Mycelium & Timber Used to Grow Furniture

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Mycelium + Timber

A collaboration between British furniture designer and maker Sebastian Cox and design strategist Ninela Ivanova has resulted in a range of stools and lights ‘grown’ from mushroom mycelium and waste timber.

The Mycelium + Timber collection is formed as the mycelium grows around purpose-built wooden frames, binding the pieces together. Scrap coppiced hazelwood and goat willow (two British species with no economic value) are combined with the mycelium species fomes fomentarius – a pairing identified as the most effective following the duo’s extensive research.

The mycelium is grown in vats, creating a malleable material that can be moulded into shape by the designers before being dried out. Once dried, the furniture is incredibly strong, sturdy and lightweight. A suede-like texture occurs naturally on the surface, adding an interesting and domestic quality, and the pieces are also completely compostable.

This process of biofacture ­– where biological organisms are used to manufacture new materials – is used across multiple applications, with bacteria, algae and protein fibres providing sustainable material alternatives. By taking advantage of the symbiotic relationship between wood and fungus, this collection explores the potential of mycelium as a material in commercial furniture design.

Mycelium + Timber was presented at the Design Frontiers exhibition at Somerset House in London (September 18-24), which coincided with London Design Festival 2017. Look out for more coverage of this event. For more on natural composites, see New Naturals and Home Ground: Materials.

Published: 22 Sep 2017

S/S 18 Influencer Show: Prada

A strong S/S showing from Miuccia Prada, dedicated to the power of women and their strength in the face of adversity. That message was delivered in everything on the runway, from the masculine tailoring, to the rock-studded accessories. 

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Prada S/S 18
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Prada S/S 18
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Prada S/S 18

Celebrating the strength of sisterhood has been an ongoing preoccupation of the designer over the past few seasons, and the influence manifested itself for S/S 18 with a play on masculine/feminine, boy-meets-girl silhouettes, colour and fabrication.

Think masculine tweeds and feminine brocades, sassy skin prints and small-scale geos, boyish shorts and full 50s circle skirts, neat buttoned-up shirts and sexy back-slit pencil skirts. These played out in a palette of boardroom blacks and greys with pops of girly pastels and juicy brights.

Powerful shoulder lines and pushed-up sleeves informed the mannish coats and jackets that ran through the collection. Some garments were printed to celebrate crease lines, while other pieces bristled with customised studs, beads and paillettes. The season’s emerging plastic mac was present and correct too, here in glossy spot-printed patent.

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Prada S/S 18
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Prada S/S 18
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Prada S/S 18

Pastel-hued kitsch cartoon graphics and an all-over comic-book print were key standouts, mirroring the blow-up cartoons that provided the backdrop to the show. Think cute Manga-girl motifs, 30s and 60s comic-strip heroines and cartoon imagery of Angela Davis, the celebrated 70s US revolutionary. Her famous quote – “To understand how any society functions, you must understand the relationship between the men and the women” – could have been the mantra of the show.

Offsetting the brocade dresses were asymmetric knitted tanks and thrift-shop-styled coats, a raft of iconic nylon Prada satchels, studded sandals and kitten-heeled stilettos, hardware-trimmed brogues, and luxe croc handheld bags. 

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Prada S/S 18
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Prada S/S 18
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Prada S/S 18

NEED TO KNOW

  • Masculine/feminine vibes
  • Strong, masculine-themed outerwear and tailoring versus girly skirts and dresses
  • Boardroom separates and sexy pencil skirts
  • Cartoon graphics on pastel grounds
  • Feminine pastel knitwear and boyish shorts
  • Leopard and tiger print versus generic spots and stripes
  • Bejewelled and studded decoration
  • The timely return of the signature nylon Prada bag.  
Published: 22 Sep 2017

E-Services Get Physical: Square’s Support-Centric Store

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Square Showroom

US payment processing tech company Square is strengthening its relationship with growing businesses by giving its relatively intangible services a physical touchpoint: a support-centric showroom in SoHo, New York.

Called Square Showroom, the ‘store’ lets customers test new hardware and software products in an intimate setting alongside company representatives. Additionally, it provides on-site training, demonstrations and troubleshooting for specific products, plus one-on-one brand consultations to help prospective clients determine which payment solutions (both online and offline) best suit their needs.

It will also host sponsored events and business workshops to witness first-hand how retailers use its products, facilitating more comprehensive R&D (for more on this, see Intimate, Democratic & Inclusive and our forthcoming report Beta Blends: Dynamic & Dexterous Design, publishing September 25), while testing the waters for further showrooms.

Adding contextual weight to the concept, the flagship also carries a curated selection of products from eight partnered businesses – brands presently using Square, such as independent jewellery makers and product designers – which will be updated monthly. It’s open by appointment only on weekdays, and to the public on weekends.

It’s not the only concept to translate an entirely online experience into the physical realm this month. Japanese messaging app Line has opened a toy store called Line Friends in New York’s Times Square to promote the brand’s emoji-like characters and establish its presence in the US market. 

For more on the value of brands providing greater support systems for consumers, see Purchasing Peace of Mind in The Supportive Sell.

See also Tactics for Retailing Tech and Active Flagships.

Published: 21 Sep 2017

S/S 18 Influencer Show: Gucci

Milan Fashion Week got off to a rip-roaring start with Gucci’s ode to all things glitzy and retro-inspired. Designer Alessandro Michele gave us 70s Princess Diana tweeds, 80s Dynasty shoulders and the razzle-dazzle of Elton John’s vintage costume box, via the overblown excesses of Farrah Fawcett hair.

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Gucci S/S 18
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Gucci S/S 18
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Gucci S/S 18

Vintage influences are nothing new from Michele, who has magically revamped the Gucci label with his references from the past. This season, the designer did nothing more than evolve his signature maximalist style, delivering looks that will resonate in a big way with the fast-to-market end of the high street.

Many of the looks on display confirmed messages seen elsewhere this season, albeit done with all of Michele’s customary panache –sequins, tick; satin, tick; metallics, tick. But running alongside were strong-shouldered tweed blazers and demure, ladylike pleated skirts, exaggerated blousons (emerging as a key trend here in Milan) and starry red-carpet 70s maxi dresses, along with a classic brown mink coat – the signature uniform of Milanese matrons and ‘Park Avenue princesses’ back in the 80s.

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Gucci S/S 18
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Gucci S/S 18
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Gucci S/S 18

Flame-like jewelled trims were the motif du jour, seen on everything from the shoulders of 80s-style leather jackets to boldly coloured knitwear. These were worked in Michele’s incongruous style, featuring delicate 18th-century sprigged florals. Branding was everywhere – from the Gucci slogan sweats to the double GGs embedded in plush velvet, or worked as a fine jacquard on linear knit separates and all-over micro repeat prints.

As ever, the collection was the sum of its parts. The influence of items like those jewelled blousons and 70s shellsuits, plus the myriad accessories – from the chunky jewelled double-G pendants to the padded hairbands – will be the high-street’s takeaways for S/S 18.

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Gucci S/S 18
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Gucci S/S 18
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Gucci S/S 18

NEED TO KNOW

  • A play on contrasts
  • 70s and 80s influences
  • Glam rock and Dynasty-inspired silhouettes
  • Sequins, satin, velvet and leather
  • Saturated brights and recoloured metallics
  • Suburban tweeds and matronly mink
  • Flame motifs combined with jewels
  • Throwback shellsuits and delicate boudoir sheers. 
Published: 21 Sep 2017

Trending Opportunity: Time-Focused Beauty Bundles

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Trending Opportunity: Time-Focused Beauty Bundles

Lifestyle marketing and time-tailored solutions are key drivers for a new wave of beauty products, touting month-long skincare programmes and special-occasion regimes that cater to consumers looking for guaranteed results. 

“There is mass appeal and a lot of promise in the merging of needs-based solutions and lifestyle marketing. This idea will grow,” Deanna Utroske, senior correspondent at industry news source CosmeticsDesign.com, told Stylus. Two new launches are capitalising on the concept of time-dedicated beauty regimes:

  • Australian skincare brand Jurlique has announced the release of its Radiance and Renewal 28 Day Programme, a two-step treatment that renews and rejuvenates dull and tired skin. The two products, used in turn for 14 days each, work alongside the skin’s natural renewal cycle. Step one is a lightweight lotion that exfoliates the skin, while step two is a cream that smooths and replenishes. The programme will be available to purchase online from October 2.
  • Body on Demand, a new brand from British beauty company Be for Beauty, offers a product regime designed to tighten and sculpt the body through the reduction of water retention.

    The three-product programme includes the 20 Mins Body Boost Bath Prep, bath salts that drive out sweat and toxins; the Everyday Body Boost Sorbet, a hydrating lotion that sculpts excess skin; and the Body Boosting Supplements that improve gut health and support natural weight loss. The products are offered in occasion-specific beauty bundles: 1 Month Holiday Prep, 2 Month Wedding Prep and Weekly Night Out.

For more on time-based beauty solutions, see Future Beauty: Perfecting Bespoke.

Published: 20 Sep 2017

Flyleather: Nike’s New Super Material

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Nike Flyleather Cortez

Nike has partnered with UK-based eco leather brand E-Leather to develop a new “super material” called Flyleather.

The textile innovation was created after the sportswear giant found the production of leather – its 10th most used upper fabric – was disproportionately unsustainable compared to its other materials.

The fabric is made by mixing loose fibres and recycled leather offcuts with a polyester blend to create a paste, which is then rolled out into sheets of “new” leather. Any waste goes back into the production process, creating a closed-loop cycle. 

The flexible textile is five times stronger and 40% lighter than full-grain leather. It also uses 90% less water to produce and creates a carbon footprint 80% lower than traditional leather.

The eco-friendly material was appropriately launched to coincide with New York’s Climate Week (September 18-24) and forms part of Nike’s pledge to reduce its environmental footprint by 50% by 2020.

For more on fashion’s environmental focus, see Sustainable 360 – part of our Industry Trend The New Fashion Landscape: 2017 Update. For more on Nike’s textile innovations, see Sustainable Wardrobes.

Published: 20 Sep 2017

Sleek Campaign Tackles Make-Up Shaming

Sleek MakeUp has launched a global campaign called My Face. My Rules in a bid to tackle make-up shaming. Touching on themes of empowerment, individualism and uniqueness, it aims to positively acknowledge everyone’s right to define their own beauty.

The British brand’s comprehensive range of inclusive and accessible colour cosmetics cater to those often ignored by the mainstream beauty industry. The campaign encapsulates its core values of diversity and individuality, with images and videos featuring its own consumers, who were cast via social media. It showcases their make-up skills and inspiring responses to negative personal experiences.

The brand worked with international anti-bullying charity Ditch the Label to commission a corresponding survey. It found that 75% of people think women look better with no or less make-up, while more than a quarter of respondents had felt judged for wearing it. “We hope this research will contribute to the growing discussion against make-up shaming, and will bring us a step closer to our vision of a world that is fair, equal and free from all types of bullying,” said Liam Hackett, the charity’s founder.

Sleek MakeUp has also released a manifesto alongside the campaign that aims to encourage conversation around the representation of make-up lovers in society. It pledges to challenge beauty industry norms and continue supporting its consumers’ passion for cosmetics.

This is one of a few shrewd beauty strategies that are beginning to acknowledge marginalised and underserved markets. For more, see Advocating Realness and Gender-Fluid Generation.

Published: 20 Sep 2017

Benefactor Brands: Tiffany’s Studiomakers Plan Backs Artists

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Tiffany's Studiomakers

US jewellery brand Tiffany & Co. has jumped into the growing pool of brands taking a socially active stance by launching an international artists support programme Outset, which is kicking off in London.

Seven London artists (all MA graduates from major London colleges) will receive rent-free studio space and may get an opportunity to work with Tiffany on pieces for its London stores. The move responds to London becoming prohibitively expensive for young artists to live and work in, despite its heritage as a hub for experimental creative talent.

“London is one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in. There’s a big disconnect between the cost of living and being an artist here,” said Richard Moore, Tiffany’s British-born vice-president and creative director of store design and visual merchandising.

Moore inferred that more arts-backing initiatives are to come, continuing a core brand legacy. Louis Comfort Tiffany, the brand’s inaugural design director (1902), was a leader of the Art Nouveau movement, while in the 1950s its head of design, Gene Moore, commissioned then-fledgling artists Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to create window displays. Tiffany also sponsored the 2017 Whitney Biennial, spotlighting contemporary American artists.

Beyond illustrating brand generosity and artistic legacy, Outset also highlights Tiffany’s ongoing rebrand, from stalwart of the traditional jewellery scene to modern label. See Tiffany & Co. Rebrands Via Pop-Up and Same-Sex Tiffany Ad Fuels Rebrand.

For more on localised social advocacy, see Selfridges Launches Music Venue, Local Matters and Retail’s Activist Brands.

See also Jewellery Retail’s New Horizons

Published: 19 Sep 2017

Unilever’s State of Innovation Report

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Unilever Foundry

Unilever's tech incubator Foundry launched a report on global collaboration between brands and start-ups at marketing conference Dmexco this month. The State of Innovation predicts that corporates and start-ups will work side by side in the same physical space by 2025, with four out of five (80%) businesses saying that start-ups can have a positive impact on a large company's approach to innovation.

The report emphasises that "tech tourism" – where brands make a short-term investment in start-up-driven initiatives as a kind of box-ticking innovation exercise – is of little worth. "Collaboration can no longer be viewed as an optional extra – it's a strategic imperative," said Aline Santos, Unilever's European vice-president of global marketing. "Start-ups are now widely recognised as invaluable sources of innovation, fuelling growth and providing pioneering business solutions."

The Unilever Foundry has successfully helped scale up 48% of its pilots in the past three years. One of its latest projects is a direct-to-consumer ingredients app for Hellman's in collaboration with on-demand delivery app Quiqup. See Rapid Retail: Hellmann's Trials Impulse Groceries App for more.

Incorporating start-up strategies into your business is something we discuss in Marketing Like a Start-Up, and will be exploring in even more detail in our upcoming Macro Trend, The Work/Life Revolution.

Published: 19 Sep 2017

S/S 18 Influencer Show: Preen

Preen delivered one of the season’s most delectably pretty collections, with cobweb-light silhouettes and a delicate colour palette delivering an escapist dream in today’s troubled times.

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Preen S/S 18
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Preen S/S 18
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Preen S/S 18

Simple cottons and washed linens spoke of a more secure, homely past, worked into languid, deconstructed shapes with the tiniest accent of vivid red dressmaker embroidery.

That same homespun dressmaker feel ran through the collection’s delicate ruching and pin-tucked details, mousetail-thin rouleau ties, patchwork-effect sweaters and ‘Sunday best’ Puritan collars. Deconstructed looks were another recurring theme, best seen in boudoir-style satin and lace pieces, layered with a seductive insouciance.

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Preen S/S 18
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Preen S/S 18
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Preen S/S 18

Soft, unstructured linen trench coats and slouchy pants added a covered-up feel to contrast with romantically wispy slip dresses worked in feather-light Chantilly lace, light-as-air silk organzas and crystal-studded cobweb lace. Meanwhile, colour reinforced the romantic escapist vibe, with a palette of barely there tinted pales and faux nude tones, shot through with flashes of vivid scarlet, black and white.

Ruffled asymmetric hems, lace edging, floral sequin motifs and off-kilter drawstring effects were just some of the details that defined the look, alongside childlike knee-high socks, deconstructed organza bonnets and simple slipper flats. 

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Preen S/S 18
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Preen S/S 18
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Preen S/S 18

NEED TO KNOW

  • Romantic escapism
  • Weightless fabrics complemented by a delicate palette of pales and vivid red
  • Boudoir silks, lace and satins contrasted with homely cottons and washed linen
  • Dressmaker details
  • Deconstructed shirts, trench coats and slouchy pants, versus boudoir slip dresses, camisoles and ruffled tea dresses.
Published: 19 Sep 2017

Colourful Exhibition Celebrates Folk Textiles

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Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle

A new exhibition by London-based artist and textile designer Caitlin Hinshelwood presents a series of strikingly coloured textile banners inspired by the folk practices of the UK’s historic weaving communities.

Kissing the Shuttle explores ideas of protest and resistance inherent among the industrial workforces of north-west England and Northern Ireland, as well as their camaraderie and traditional songs. Research drawn from various British institutions resulted in imagery influenced by the symbolism, speech and customs of the textile trades during and after the Industrial Revolution.

Referencing union banners, the large-scale textile pieces are screen-printed on silk in brilliant shades of orange, purple and green. Embellishments of rosettes, ribbons and fringing are reminiscent of folk costumes and historic trade union regalia. 

Hinshelwood’s refreshing use of colour leads to unexpected pairings. “I always try to dye a few [base fabrics] in colours I don't like or know what to do with,” she told Stylus. “It forces me to embrace new combinations and challenge my perception of colours I ‘like’.”

Her perception is also influenced by colour-blindness. “People find it surprising… but I don't really think about it,” she says. “I just make the colours as I see them or want them to be. Sometimes I realise the colour I think I've made is different to the way someone else sees it, but I don't think that really matters.”

Held at London’s Cecil Sharp House, the exhibition runs from September 26 to January 28 2018. For more on colour perception, see Breathing Colour Exhibition

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Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
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Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
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Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
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Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
Published: 19 Sep 2017

US Hispanic Women: Educated, Powerful & Influential

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Some 40% of US Hispanic women say that people often seek their advice before buying something

American Latinas (Hispanic women) are increasingly well-educated, progressing financially and influencing mainstream buying behaviour, according to a new report from global market research company Nielsen. Highlights include:  

  • Latina Ascent: US Hispanic women are entering the workforce in increasing numbers. Over the last five years, the number of female majority-owned firms in America rose by 27%, while Latina majority-owned firms grew by 87%. In the same period, the number of Hispanic male majority-owned firms increased by 39%.
  • Culturally Proud: Connection to their culture and language is vital for US Latinas. While only 34% are born outside the country, around three-quarters (74%) speak a language other than English at home. Although four-fifths (81%) speak English well, 95% of foreign-born Hispanic women and 59% of those born in the US speak at least some Spanish at home.
  • Influencing Purchases: Latinas hold sway over purchasing decisions, with 40% of Hispanic women saying that people often seek their advice before buying something. Their children have the power when it comes to the purchases they make: 51% agree their kids have a significant impact on the brands they choose.
  • Choosing Singledom: Latina marriage rates in the US are low, with many women opting to marry later or not at all. Those born in America are less likely to get married than their foreign-born peers. Around one-quarter (24%) of US-born female Hispanic millennials (aged 18 to 34) have married, compared to 44% of those born elsewhere.

For more insights on bicultural Hispanic consumers, see Culture Guardians and Hispanicize 2016.

Published: 18 Sep 2017

S/S 18 Influencer Show: Simone Rocha

Simone Rocha delivered one of the prettiest collections of the season so far, tapping into the emerging mood for escapism with silhouettes straight from the Victorian nursery.

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Simone Rocha S/S 18
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Simone Rocha S/S 18
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Simone Rocha S/S 18

The look was the culmination of the Victorian/Edwardian influences that have underpinned the high street in recent seasons, with frou-frou ruffles and flounces adding volume to swingy, smock-shaped dresses.

Pouffed bubble hemlines added to the babydoll look, highlighted with a palette of crisp white and palest balletic pinks, along with the quirky, homespun embroidered doll motifs tracing the edges of soft, undulating frills. Rocha delivered a darker Victoriana mood in the collection’s black taffetas, jet beading and funereal satins, alleviated by sprigged rosebud florals and simplistic sequined daisy flowers on sheers. 

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Simone Rocha S/S 18
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Simone Rocha S/S 18
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Simone Rocha S/S 18

Crisp cottons, broderie anglaise, organza and ethereal tulle were offset with the more sculptural appeal of moire taffetas and the rustic touch of rose-patterned, homespun tweeds, with their tufted floral trims. Meanwhile, elegantly worked bias satin dresses straight from a 30s boudoir delivered a change of tack.

It may not have been the season’s most commercial collection, but it perfectly encapsulated the emerging mood for a return to simpler, childlike-times. There were plenty of influences to inspire party developments, along with covetable accessories like the squishy clutch bag, cellophane-look sandals and red velvet Mary Janes.

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Simone Rocha S/S 18
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Simone Rocha S/S 18
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Simone Rocha S/S 18

NEED TO KNOW 

  • Childlike, babydoll looks
  • Taffetas, organza and frothy tulles for voluminous ruffled silhouettes
  • Ruffles and frills continue, highlighted with naïve embroidery motifs
  • Multiple layers of contrasting fabrics for tone-on-tone texture
  • Sequined flower motifs, sprigged florals and tufted flower shapes
  • Velvet accessories.

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