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Published: 16 Jul 2018

Brooklyn Eats 2018: Three Trends to Watch

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Clockwise L-R: Mama O's, Yolélé, Pierless Fish

At Brooklyn Eats 2018 (June 28), local companies demonstrated mass-market appeal with product launches that echoed themes spotted at New York’s Summer Fancy Food Show (June 30 to July 3). These are our top picks for products that capture the culinary innovation brewing in the borough.

  • Internationally Inspired Condiments: As seen at the Summer Fancy Food Show, companies are giving formerly niche sauces mass-market makeovers. Brooklyn kimchi producer Mama O’s presented Spicy Kimchili sauce, which combines the sweet tang of sriracha with the heat and fermented flavour of the brand’s spicy kimchi.

    Condiment brand Brooklyn Delhi presented its curry ketchup and curry mustard, which launched at Whole Foods supermarkets nationwide early this year. They serve as a mainstream companion to the brand’s tomato and roast garlic achaars (Indian relishes).

  • Africa’s Super Grain: Local start-up Yolélé partnered with Senegalese chef Pierre Thiam on a line of fonio – a West African grain that looks like quinoa, but cooks quickly like couscous. While the company aspires to make fonio an American pantry staple, launching in Brooklyn taps a cohort willing to spend on products sourced directly from farmers.

    Fonio is also popular elsewhere. Illinois-based Manitou Trading launched two fonio mixes at Summer Fancy Food Show 2018.

  • Gill-to-Scale Pet Food: As noted at Global Pet Expo, forward-thinking pet brands are following broader trends by investing in sustainably sourced food. Seafood wholesaler Pierless Fish has developed dog treats that repurpose fish scraps left over after butchering. The product cleverly reduces food waste – a theme explored in-depth in Sustainable Restaurants.
Published: 11 Jul 2018

MakeUp in Paris 2018: Top 5 Trends

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From extreme colour to unisex make-up, the 2018 edition of annual cosmetics and packaging trade show MakeUp in Paris (June 21-22) highlighted strong beauty directions, with brands and formulators prioritising sustainability with sex appeal.

Here are the top five trends from the show:

  • Advanced Colour Cosmetics: Some of the most exciting launches showcased make-up with added skincare benefits. Italian cosmetics developer Ancorotti launched an entire eye collection with products that tapped into this. Mascara Electra, for example, boasts a formula containing an active ingredient called Blue Lock to protect the lashes against damage from the blue light emitted from smartphone and laptop screens.

    For more on pollutant-protective product and the growing importance of this category in both make-up and skincare, see Agile Beauty and Pollution Protection Update.
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Ancorotti
  • Extreme Colour: Colour cosmetic developers were keen to showcase new launches that tapped into extreme and dynamic colour. A standout product line came from German brand Weckerle. Its UV Collection of lip liners, lipsticks and a mascara offers bold colours that glow bright blue under UV light – ideal for young, music-loving consumers.

    Bold metallics also fall under this category, with brands like US pharmaceutical company Merck, international chemicals producer BASF, and US cosmetics business Presperse showing advanced pigments with holographic and enhanced light reflection. An example of finished product showing the appeal of molten metallics was German brand Gotha Cosmetics’ award-winning Metal Foil Eye Cream.

    Holographic visuals were also seen in beauty accessories, such as the bright make-up bag showcased by German developer Geka.
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  • Sustainability Push: Unlike previous years, sustainable and ethical credentials were key drivers for new product development, in line with growing consumer demand for eco-friendly beauty. More simplistic initiatives, like French manufacturer Alkos’s solid shampoo and perfume bars, tap into the success of British natural brand Lush’s solid products. And Italian packaging manufacturer Mktg Industry launched its Gea Collection of cardboard beauty packaging featuring minimal, but nonetheless recyclable, plastic.

    More technically impressive examples of sustainability were seen in French developer Cosmogen’s new sustainable raw material PCR, which behaves like plastic and can replace most, if not 100%, of the material in the brand’s packaging portfolio.

    German brand Schwan Cosmetics showcased its eco-friendly range of beauty pencils. They’re made from renewable wood using an industry-first technology that allows high-quality formulas to be encased in wood without degrading quickly. For more on the latest in eco beauty, see The Great Beauty Green-Up.
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  • Velvet Allure: From a formula perspective, the texture of choice this year was velvet. Numerous raw cosmetics developers highlighted the appeal of velvet finishes that combine the pigment payoff of matte with the comfort of gloss or cream finishes.

    The beauty division of German pen and pencil manufacturer Faber Castell introduced Velvet Delight – a glide-on lipstick with a velvety, matte finish that is pigment-rich and lasts for up to six hours.

    According to the brand, it doesn’t dry out the lips as many long-wear matte formulas can, but still retains their non-feathering, transfer-resistant appeal. Enriched with Panthenol (a form of vitamin B5 used as a moisturiser and lubricating compound), the product glides on like butter, but stays put.
  • Unisex Appeal: As we explore in The Male Beauty Moment  and Asian Beauty Now: New Markets, New Ideas, men are becoming more open to the idea of using make-up. But there is still only a handful of brands creating product that’s aimed at them, or marketing their offerings as unisex.

    In response, Ancorotti is introducing an entire unisex range of make-up products that could appeal to all genders, with the aim of inspiring men to express themselves. The Skin Wears Silk powder, for example, can be used by women to finish off their make-up look, while men (who tend to have oilier, and therefore shinier skin) can use it on its own to mattify.
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Published: 9 Jul 2018

Lush Launches Inclusive, Packaging-Free Foundation Worldwide

Following the opening of Lush’s packaging-free store in Milan, the brand has pledged to further develop its eco-friendly range with an inclusive twist.  

British naturals brand Lush is expanding its make-up line with vegan multi-tonal foundation sticks – set to launch in 18 countries. The compact Slap Sticks are available in 40 hues with cool, neutral or warm undertones. Hero ingredients Indonesian coconut oil, Turkish rose wax and Peruvian jojoba oil hydrate and brighten the skin.  

The development of shade-inclusive collections is becoming the norm for the colour cosmetics industry, as savvy beauty brands acknowledge diverse consumer groups. Cult US companies ColourPop and CoverGirl are good examples – both have recently relaunched their foundation ranges with up to 42 hues. 

In a bid to reduce plastic waste, each Slap Stick is housed in a biodegradable wax casing, encouraging wearers to forego traditional glass or plastic foundation bottles. This ‘unpackaged’ approach has been successfully implemented within the brand’s hair and bodycare ranges – currently, over 35% of Lush’s products are ‘naked’.

In addition, the sticks offer on-the-go usability. The easy-grip egg shape of the foundation stick – which resembles a make-up sponge – ensures consumers can apply the make-up with their fingers and blend the formula for an airbrushed finish, without the use of bulky applicator tools.

While currently a limited-edition run, if popular, they could be rolled out as a permanent feature, and inspire the brand to explore more packaging-free product development in other categories.

For deeper insights into sustainable packaging solutions and diversity in the beauty industry, see A Sustainable JourneyThe Great Beauty Green-Up and Inclusive Beauty: 5 Key Lessons.

Published: 6 Jul 2018

Minecraft Harnesses Player Creativity to Save Corals

Global hit game Minecraft is pulling its players' design skills into the physical realm to help restore coral reefs.

To promote its recent Aquatic update – where players can build and explore underwater landscapes – Minecraft drew players into the new game environment by challenging them to build virtual coral reefs. Once 10 million underwater building blocks were placed, Minecraft released a donation to US environmental charity The Nature Conservancy.

The gaming community further boosted donations by buying in-game design items, with all proceeds going towards the cause. The Nature Conservancy said the funds generated will enable the placement of 15,000 corals in the US Virgin Islands, Mexico, Dominican Republic and the Bahamas.

The initiative also turned some of the resulting in-game designs into actual underwater sculptures made from BioRock – a man-made medium that promotes coral growth. Six BioRock structures have been installed off the coast of Cozumel, Mexico; three feature familiar characters from the Minecraft franchise, while the remaining three were designed by players.

On Earth Day in April 2018, Pokémon Go galvanised its mobile gamers by rewarding players who showed up at geolocations for environmental clean-up events. Clearly, there is huge engagement potential for brands that know how to harness the gaming community's creative energies and narrative passions.

For more on how cross-play (the ability to play the same game across mobile- and home-bound devices) will create opportunities for brands to use the narrative immersion of gaming to drive actions in the physical world, see our recap of E3 2018.

Published: 6 Jul 2018

K-Design Awards: 3 Ways to Add Value in Packaging

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Clockwise L-R: Rong Design, EKDP, Rong Design

Now in its seventh year, Korea’s K-Design Awards celebrate the best in spatial, industrial and communication design. We share our three favourite packaging projects and the key learnings they illustrate.

  • Chinese packaging studio Rong Design created a chocolate bar theatrically titled Chocolate the Planet. The top of each bar is moulded to mimic the surface texture of either Mars, Earth or the Moon, and a similar pattern is printed on the inside of the otherwise unassuming packaging.

    Using texture as a canvas elevates goods from the everyday to an experiential indulgence. For more ornate packaging examples, see Packaging Futures: Luxury
  • Also from Rong Design is the Fulu bottle, inspired by the shape of the calabash. In China, this fruit is celebrated as a symbol of good fortune, due to its tough skin making it suitable for use as a vessel. The form of the bottle cinches inwards in the middle, like the fruit, and is tied with a leather strap for easy carrying.

    Here, form is used to add functionality and reference culturally specific images. This creates both a modern and traditional quality that emphasises the product’s practical and symbolic relevance to the targeted consumer. 
  • Korean packaging company EKDP has developed a bottle cap that simplifies plastic recycling. When unscrewing the lid for the first time, rather than breaking away from the bottle top – leaving a small ring around the neck that needs to be cut off to be recycled – the entire cap splits off.

    This simple detail means that one step is eliminated from the recycling process. In a time where sustainability is a must and no longer a nice-to-have, brands need to really consider how design can influence the life of the product beyond consumer use. See Packaging Futures: Sustainability for more.
Published: 6 Jul 2018

Graduate Textiles 2018: 5 Designers to Watch

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Diane Bresson

Each summer, the latest graduate shows offer an insight into our creative future, with the next generation of talent showcasing an exciting array of new, unseen work. We scoured the shows for the emerging UK textile designers with the most promising projects and innovative use of colour and materials. Here’s our edit of the ones to watch.

  • Pattern Play: In line with themes in our S/S 18 Colour Spectrum direction Perspective, Diane Bresson from Central Saint Martins (CSM) produced a striking collection of digital and screen-printed wallpapers in dynamic and intriguing patterns. Simple geometric shapes and textures were overlaid in a number of explorative colour combinations to create complex patterns that appear to play with perception. The wallpaper lengths can be hung in various ways to create multiple pattern options.

    The designer also experimented with the fusion of pattern and moving colour. Digitally printed wallpapers were animated with coloured light projections, exploring how static pattern can become experiential. Be sure to watch the video here.
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  • Softening Hard Materials: Responding to our busy modern lives, CSM graduate Lucy Paskell similarly focused on improving wellbeing by creating textiles that engage the user through touch. Her collection of surface solutions considered how to bring the feelings of comfort experienced in domestic spaces into our everyday surroundings, by softening and adding tactility to hard surfaces.

    Soft upholstery fabrics such as velvet and leather were combined with wood veneer, digital embroidery and 3D-print techniques such as embossing to create touchable relief surfaces. Suitable for a number of interior applications, the nature of the techniques allows surfaces to be personalised to suit the space and user.
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  • Reconnecting with Nature: In an impressive and thorough body of work, Heather Ratliff from Loughborough University explored how textiles can help us to reconnect with nature and improve mental wellbeing.

    Her collection of fabrics for (slow) fashion brought together ideas of biophilic design, craftsmanship, tactility and sensory experiences through carefully considered textures, colours, pattern and scent. Crafted hand-stitching added texture for a haptic experience, patterns were inspired by natural rhythms, and scents such as jasmine and lavender infused fabrics – all in a bid to benefit the wearer.
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  • Sustainable Processes: A respect for sustainable materials and working methods continues to drive textile graduates. Focusing on the potential of British wool, Alison Wibmer from the Edinburgh College of Art took a considerate approach when creating her collection of inviting wool-based interior fabrics.

    The designer worked with the notion of “fibre to fabric”, locally and ethically sourcing fleece that was washed, spun and felted by hand before being embroidered and dyed sustainably. Resourceful dye processes, such as batch dyeing and reusing waste water were employed to maximise resources and minimise waste. See Considered Colour and Home Ground: Colour S/S 2019 for more on responsible dye processes. 

    Wibmer’s bold and comforting textiles, suitable for rugs and flooring, incorporated other biodegradable fibres such as Tencel and bamboo to add surface interest through colour and material variation.
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  • Modernising Craftsmanship: Royal College of Art graduate Sophie Graney presented a playful collection of handwoven outdoor fabrics that combine traditional techniques such as lacework with unconventional materials like PVC, rubber-coated yarn and leather. The bold, colour-blocked pieces are waterproof and suitable for outdoor lifestyle accessories and exterior furnishings.

    Contemporary takes on traditional craft and skills are a concept we explored in our recent S/S 20 Materials Focus – see Hands of Time for more.
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For more textile inspiration, see Milan 2018: Accessories & Textiles and Première Vision S/S 19.

 

Published: 5 Jul 2018

Fashion’s Future Fabrics: Brands Tap Sustainability & Tech

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L-R: Loomia, Circular Systems, COS

Consumer demand for sustainable goods and advanced technology is on the rise. Smart brands and retailers are finding innovative ways to satisfy these environmentally conscious yet stylistically discerning millennials. Here, we take a look at three future-facing fashion projects and innovations for July.

  • H&M-owned brand Cos has launched its savvy new Repurposed Cotton Project – a collection of sweatshirts made entirely of cotton scraps from a year of production. The low-cost process entails shredding, compacting, spinning, weaving and dying the discarded cotton, with the results identical in look and feel to similar non-sustainable alternatives. 
  • Brooklyn-based start-up Loomia has developed a nylon-like material that works like a circuit board and can be draped, creased and stretched. Not only can the textile emit light and heat, allowing the user to illuminate their path at night or warm their clothes in the winter, but it can also gather valuable data for fashion companies. The user can seamlessly sell this data – which includes their surrounding climate and activity levels – to fashion brands and retailers, who can use the data as feedback to improve their products and design processes.
  • LA-based materials start-up Circular Systems uses banana by-products, pineapple leaves, flax and hemp stalk, and waste created from crushing sugar cane to create a natural fibre that can be woven into material fabrications for garments. The company will work with brands like H&M and Levi’s to integrate its fibres into their fabric-manufacturing operations.

For more on sustainable solutions, see A Sustainable Journey, Fashion’s Sustainability Surge and Sustainability Turns Smart: Manufacturing a Clean Future

Published: 4 Jul 2018

Is ‘Drone Tech’ the Future of Smart Skincare?

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Lisa Franklin

British facialist and skincare expert Lisa Franklin has launched her eponymous beauty line, featuring a precision ‘drone delivery’ system and performance-enhanced formulas to protect the skin from pollutants. The luxury range is aimed at the growing ‘skintellectual’ consumer base hungry for smarter skincare.

The Pro-Effect System includes (but is not limited to) an Anti-Pollution Cleanser, a Pollution Defence Cream and an Overnight Renew Treatment. The ‘drone’ system – referencing the aerial vehicle’s agility in homing in on a target ­– intelligently delivers ingredients to the areas that need to be treated. A similar technology is employed by Clinique in its Smart skincare range.

Franklin’s hero product in the range is the Luminescent Base, a mattifying serum that is superior in its multifunctionality. Ingredients such as hyaluronic acid and konjac root aid long-term hydration, while nutrient-rich botanical extracts improve skin firmness and reduce redness or irritation. Photoluminescent diamond particles reflect light and illuminate the skin, while a unique bioactive complex reduces the amount of ultraviolet radiation from digital screens that penetrate the skin, and supports cell turnover following sun exposure.

The line also showcases ethical values. It’s vegan, cruelty-free, natural ingredients are sustainably sourced, and all packaging is 100% recyclable. The brand has also been stamped with the Positive Luxury Butterfly Mark, which is awarded by the British regulatory platform to brands that have a positive social and environmental impact. As we explore in The Great Beauty Green-Up, ethical values are now critical for brands as global consumers wise up to the impact of beauty products on the environment.

Published: 27 Jun 2018

New Eco-Material Made from Coconut Waste

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Coconut bio waste is made into sustainable material

Addressing the increasingly voracious consumer demand for ethical and sustainable material production, Aussie start-up Nanollose has developed the world's first rayon fabric made of biowaste from the food industry.

The material, called Nullarbor, is made by adding microbes to coconut biomass. This naturally ferments the otherwise wasted industry byproduct to create microbial cellulose, which can be used to create a rayon-based material.

This process uses very little land, water or energy, as well as none of the pesticides and fertilisers used to create conventional rayon, which is sourced from wood pulp. According to the brand, this process can also be used to convert wasted biomass from the beer and wine industries, demonstrating the broader potential for this process.

Nanollose chief executive Alfie Germano said: "My vision is for Nanollose to be at the forefront of offering fashion and textile groups a viable alternative, and decreasing the industry's reliance on environmentally burdensome, raw materials."

This process further shows how ingredients and waste products traditionally found in the food industry can have myriad cross-industry applications, as discussed in our report Trans-Industry Ingredients. It also speaks to growing consumer expectations for sustainable textiles in fashion and interiors, as recently covered in our report A Sustainable Journey.

Published: 22 Jun 2018

Fashion’s Sustainability Surge: Top Picks From June

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Sustainable sweatshirt by US brand Reformation

As considerate consumption moves from consumer choice to consumer necessity, brands are shaping up. Game-changing sustainability initiatives seem to be launching almost every week, with big brands surprisingly leading from the front. Here, we take a look at June’s sustainability wins.

  • Proving that mainstreaming sustainability is achievable is e-tail behemoth Asos, which has announced plans to ban mohair, cashmere, silk, down and feathers across its entire platform by January 2019. The British company, which sells more than 850 labels, joins high-street heavyweights such as Topshop, H&M and Marks & Spencer in its decision to ban mohair.
  • Another household name demonstrating the demise of niche sustainability is department store chain John Lewis, which has launched a buy-back scheme with social enterprise Stuffstr. The UK-based retailer will buy back worn and unwanted clothing from its customers – including underwear and old socks – before either reselling, mending, or recycling them to make new products.
  • Swedish fast-fashion retailer H&M will permanently install a clothing repair service at its newly renovated flagship in Paris, France. The station will allow customers to mend all types of items, and also offer customisation, embroidery, patches, sewing kits and laundry bags that help keep plastic residues out of the water system.

Leaving sustainability as an afterthought isn’t good enough. With an increasingly informed and compassionate consumer population, it’s imperative for niche and household brands alike to embrace the change.

To explore how industries from fashion to food are tackling sustainability, see A Sustainable Journey, Sustainability through Community and Sustainability Turns Smart.

Published: 22 Jun 2018

London Design Fair Crowns Plastic Material of the Year

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Dirk Vander Kooij

As the public backlash against plastic continues, an increasing number of brands, designers and organisations are rethinking the way we produce, consume and recycle it. In a bid to further raise awareness, the London Design Fair (LDF) has decided to spotlight the condemned material – naming it Material of the Year.

Returning for its second showcase, LDF’s Material of the Year aims to introduce visitors to the most intriguing materials in today’s design world. At last year’s inaugural event, the title went to Jesmonite.

This year’s show highlights how plastic is being repurposed in imaginative and valuable ways. It will feature the following four noteworthy participants, who are adding desirability through design and treating plastic waste as a new virgin material.

  • London-based material designer Charlotte Kidger uses plastic waste, such as polyurethane foam dust from CNC fabrication processes, to create a new composite material. Her explorations result in products such as vases and tables, demonstrating the material’s potential.
  • Dutch designer Dirk Vander Kooij combines low-resolution 3D printing and extrusion techniques with reclaimed plastic waste to create playful furniture pieces.
  • Japanese product designer Kodai Iwamoto employs traditional glassblowing techniques with cheap, mass-produced industrial PVC plastic piping to create a collection of handcrafted tubular vases.
  • Brighton-based design studio Weez & Merl recycles waste low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by melting, kneading and manipulating the material into a variety of striking marbled sheets, suitable for homeware products and material surfaces.

Material of the Year will be on show from September 20-23 – look out for our coverage of LDF in September. For more innovative approaches to plastic, see Evolving Plastics.

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Published: 20 Jun 2018

Beauty Brand’s Pop-Ups Defy China’s Animal-Testing Laws

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Ceramiracle

China is the last major country to require animal testing on cosmetics and skincare before these items can be sold to the public – but one cruelty-free brand appears to have found a loophole.  

LA-based skincare and nutricosmetics brand Ceramiracle has emphasised its cruelty-free ethos with inventory-free, digitally led pop-up stores around China.

The company has partnered with the country’s largest digital platform WeChat to enable consumers to make purchases by scanning a QR code, which leads them to the app’s e-commerce store. The products are then delivered to the customer within three days from a warehouse in Hangzhou, a free-trade zone in Eastern China. In this region, goods can be imported, manufactured and exported without direct intervention from Chinese customs.

Ceramiracle is also capitalising on China’s e-commerce opportunity – online sales increased by 32% and totalled $1.2tn in 2017 (China’s Ministry of Commerce, 2018). Stylus’ Retail editor Stefanie Dorfer said: “WeChat is one of the most dominant digital platforms in China, and the perfect gateway for brands wanting to expand into this booming market. A strategy like this should be explored by other cruelty-free brands as they can bypass the country’s animal-testing legislation.”

Forty-seven per cent of millennials check whether luxury brands foster sustainable values before purchasing (Deloitte, 2017) – indicating the importance of considering ethical sourcing and distribution methods. For more on this, see The Great Beauty Green-Up and Doing Good.

To read more about engagement strategies that target the East, see Uni-Commerce Chinese Retail Focus, Asian Beauty Now and State of Mobile: Global Youth Focus.

Published: 18 Jun 2018

Ben & Jerry’s Tax Empowers Shoppers to Offset Carbon Impact

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Ben & Jerry's

Consumers are becoming increasingly conscious about their social and environmental impact, and are on the lookout for brands that are active in those areas. To support its sustainability credentials, US ice-cream brand Ben & Jerry’s uses blockchain to enable fans to offset their carbon impact by paying an extra penny at the till.

Ben & Jerry’s has collaborated with Maltese non-profit organisation Poseidon Foundation on an ice-cream parlour spot in London. Using blockchain tech, the brand is able to calculate the environmental impact of producing and purchasing a cone of ice cream, and gives consumers the opportunity to rebalance their footprint and actively support action on climate change by buying carbon credits. Ben & Jerry’s has pledged to buy credits for each cone and invites consumers to do so too – when paying at the checkout, the cashier asks consumers if they’d like to add an extra penny to their balance.

Carbon credits are tradable tokens linked to projects which offset the greenhouse gases created by organisations and are usually only sold in massive quantities to corporations. Poseidon splits them up into micro transactions, making them accessible to consumers. Ben & Jerry’s credits are used to support a forestry conservation project at the Cordillera Azul National Park in Peru. Since opening in May, the ice-cream parlour initiative has been able to protect more than 1,000 trees – equivalent to an area the size of 77 tennis courts.

Our reports Retail's Activist Brands and Reframing Sustainability discuss how other brands are supporting action on climate change or educating consumers on conscious consumption.

Published: 18 Jun 2018

Tiny Off-Grid Holiday Homes Tap Micro-Living Trend

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The A45 micro-cabin by Bjarke Ingels Group

A rising number of consumers are banding together in essentialist communities, with the shared desire for a more intentional, minimalist way of living. New York start-up Klein is set to appeal to these consumers with its affordable, self-powered micro-cabins that can be erected in remote locations within weeks.

The company lets people go online to choose and customise sustainable houses designed by architects from around the world. Within six months of ordering, their micro-cabin will be installed in any location in two weeks. Currently available for pre-order, its first prototype is the A45 – a 13-foot-long wood and glass cabin designed by Danish architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group.

Rising real-estate prices and construction costs make it increasingly difficult to own a holiday home. Klein hopes to change this, with planned prices for the houses ranging from $50,000 to $300,000.

The smart idea chimes with the Swedish ethos of lagom – meaning "not too much, not too little", which is inspiring people around the world to enjoy the bare necessities.

"We're seeing more people opting for the tiny life, eschewing larger, family-sized homes for the simplicity of smaller houses," says Kate Johnson, senior editor of Consumer Lifestyle at Stylus. "These so-called 'tiny housers' choose to downsize due to environmental and financial concerns, as well as the desire for more time and freedom."

Such micro dwellings also allow users to reconnect with the natural world – a key consumer desire we explored in Nature Embracers and further unpacked in our A/W 19/20 Design Directions Essence report.

Published: 13 Jun 2018

New Biodegradable Wet Wipes Lessen Beauty’s Impact on Oceans

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Pacifica

Following a number of microbead bans in the cosmetics industry, consumer demand for sustainable beauty has increased. Is eliminating environmentally damaging wet wipes the next mainstream solution?

Green beauty brands are creating eco-friendly wet wipes, responding to consumers’ concerns about the toxic impact of water pollution.

Estimates suggest that by 2050, there could be more plastic than fish in the oceans by weight (Ellen MacArthur Foundation, 2017). The beauty industry is a major contributor to this. In the UK alone, there has been a 700% increase in the number of wet wipes found along the coastline over the last decade (Marine Conservation Society, 2017).

 Stylus explores two innovative products looking to tackle the problem:

  • Yes To: American skincare brand Yes To’s new Yes To Tomatoes Detoxifying Charcoal Travelsize Facial Cleansing Wipes confront the problem head-on.

    The wipes are made from cellulose, a plant fibre that’s typically found in vegetables such as kale and broccoli. This core material is a biodegradable, compostable and renewable alternative to the plastic binders commonly used in the mass market.
  • Pacifica: US brand Pacifica is similarly tapping into this concept with its new biodegradable Pineapple Wipe Out Oil Cleansing Wipes. The wipes also offer an additional aspect of eco-friendliness, since users are not required to re-cleanse after using them, saving on water usage.

    With 18% of American personal-care users wishing their routine was shorter (Mintel, 2016), we believe this launch offers an efficient and sustainable solution for consumers on the go.

For more on eco-friendly beauty and sustainable design solutions, see The Great Beauty Green-Up, Material Direction: Evolving Plastics and Packaging Innovations 2018.

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