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Media & Marketing
Published: 18 Jul 2017

Royal Opera House & Moma: High-Culture Emoji

Extra
The Royal Opera House

For World Emoji Day on July 17 (the date featured on the calendar emoji), London's Royal Opera House (@RoyalOperaHouse) partnered with Twitter to retell the stories of famous operas and ballets using only emoji. Members of the public could win pairs of tickets by correctly guessing which stories were being retold.

"We grab any opportunity to tell narratives and teaming up with Twitter means we do this at an unprecedented scale," said Jeremy Paul, head of marketing communications, audiences and media at the Royal Opera House. "It's part of a strategy to pivot into dialogue platforms like Twitter."

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SF Moma) is also using the power of dialogue to connect to new audiences. The museum has launched a text-messaging service through which people can receive artworks from its archive in response to moods, keywords, or emoji they send.

SF Moma has 34,678 artworks in its collection, of which the museum can only display about 5% at a time. According to Keir Winesmith, head of web and digital platforms for SF Moma, skipping apps or mobile sites in favour of a text-messaging service was the best way to minimise barriers between the public and SF Moma.

Exploring channels that are accessible to broader audiences is key for any brand, and it's important that they use language that aligns with digital culture. For the latest developments in online communities' modes of communication, follow our monthly Pop Culture Round-Ups. For more on mobile engagement, see The Messaging Opportunity.

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