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Consumer Lifestyle
Published: 8 Oct 2012

The Farmery: An Urban Farm

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US industrial designer Ben Greene has unveiled his design concept for The Farmery: an urban farm conceived to provide locally grown food for city dwellers. The exact locations of these urban farms are yet to be revealed, but Greene – who has full backing for the projects – is expecting to begin construction next year.
The Farmery’s design concept is based on stacked shipping containers and traditional-looking modular greenhouses. Hydroponic growing systems incorporate fish living in the water reservoirs, helping to provide a source of nutrients and disease control for the crops. Fresh herbs and vegetables will be grown on vertical growing panels that hang off the exterior walls of the shipping containers. And mushrooms will also be harvested inside the shipping containers using traditional methods. 
The design aims to maximise every inch of the space, allowing the food to be grown and sold within the same location – eliminating shipping, packing and handling costs to provide a more cost-effective way of providing local produce. Customers will also have the opportunity to buy and grow fresh produce in the space, by purchasing plots within the farm.
Greene’s goal is to make these urban farms as common as the local corner store, acting as a major resource for local produce in urban neighbourhoods rather than a media-friendly pet project. For further insight into growing food within urban areas, see the report Edible Urban. For more on the topic of self-sufficient living and exploring natural resources, see our Control & Create Macro Trend.
The Farmery http://www.thefarmery.com/ 

US industrial designer Ben Greene has unveiled his design concept for The Farmery: an urban farm conceived to provide locally grown food for city dwellers. The exact locations of these urban farms are yet to be revealed, but Greene – who has full backing for the projects – is expecting to begin construction next year.

The Farmery’s design concept is based on stacked shipping containers and traditional-looking modular greenhouses. Hydroponic growing systems incorporate fish living in the water reservoirs, helping to provide a source of nutrients and disease control for the crops. Fresh herbs and vegetables will be grown on vertical growing panels that hang off the exterior walls of the shipping containers. And mushrooms will also be harvested inside the shipping containers using traditional methods. 

The design aims to maximise every inch of the space, allowing the food to be grown and sold within the same location – eliminating shipping, packing and handling costs to provide a more cost-effective way of providing local produce. Customers will also have the opportunity to buy and grow fresh produce in the space, by purchasing plots within the farm.

Greene’s goal is to make these urban farms as common as the local corner store, acting as a major resource for local produce in urban neighbourhoods rather than a media-friendly pet project. For further insight into growing food within urban areas, see the report Edible Urban. For more on the topic of self-sufficient living and exploring natural resources, see our Control & Create Macro Trend.


The Farmery

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